Tentes jaunes entre eau et montagnes glacées

Scientific News

To celebrate Quebec's excellence in northern research and to highlight the various challenges and issues related to these territories, Institut nordique du Québec offers you a series of articles dedicated to the research conducted in its community.

Over the months, you will discover a multidisciplinary research community whose strength lies in the complementary expertise of its members. You will meet individuals who share a strong attachment to the North and who are dedicated to producing, in collaboration with the inhabitants of the region, the knowledge necessary for its sustainable and harmonious development.

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With climate change and thawing permafrost, peatlands are often considered a "methane bomb". This overlooks the fact that climate change is also resulting in greening of the Arctic and increased CO2 uptake through photosynthesis. The outcome may not lead to the anticipated methane bomb. Michelle Garneau, a professor in the Department of Geography at the Université du Québec à Montréal, explains.
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Climate change is transforming ecosystems and therefore the food resources provided by natural environments. For the communities that depend on them, food security is at stake...
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An article by Valérie Levée, science journalist

Constructing a carbon-neutral building in southern Quebec is already a challenge, imagine that in Nunavik. Yet it is a goal that Louis Gosselin, a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Université Laval, is aiming for.

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"RISUQ will bring the experience in intersectoral health already developed in the “Near North” and work with the knowledge stemming from INQ research in the "Far North". I see this as a perfect collaboration," aspires Cathy Vaillancourt. This alliance will allow sustainable health to shine throughout Northern Quebec. A union of the strengths of RISUQ and INQ that is very promising!
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Navigation in ice poses many risks not only for the safety of the crew and cargo, but also for polar ecosystems. However, before 2017, there were no international regulations for navigation in ice-covered waters. In 2017, the Polar Code partially filled this gap. States must therefore incorporate this Code into their own legislation...
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A text by Valérie Levée, science journalist

The subsoil of the forest is much more than a carpet of dead leaves and humus. Beneath the surface, sugars, mineral elements and hormones circulate in a double network of fused roots and ectomycorrhizae, as revealed by the work of Annie DesRochers, a professor at the Institut de recherche sur les forêts of the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue.

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As elsewhere, Arctic vegetation is undergoing climate change. But if the Arctic turns green, will the blueberries still turn blue? The question is not trivial for the Inuit, for whom blueberries and other berries represent an important nutritional source and contribute to community wellbeing on the land.
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Describing and interpreting inequalities are the primary objectives of WAGE. But ultimately, comparing the link between socio-political systems and inequalities in different communities should permit identification and sharing of solutions for resolving the inequalities. 
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There is something counter-intuitive about the idea of heating a pool with geothermal energy in a region as cold as Nunavik and lacking in hot springs. However, it is becoming a reality in Kuujjuaq...
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